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       *** TRAVEL NEWS ***
               

If you are in the United States you should be aware of certain Travel Advisories which are given to citizens who choose to travel abroad. These advisories can affect you and may even change your travel plans. So before you go to the airport you should always check to see if your destination country is on the List of the United States Government Travel Advisories.

For more information: Check out the link below which will send you to the US Governments official website for the
latest information which includes the COVID-19 Virus travel restrictions.


https://travel.state.gov


HOW TO PAY LESS FOR FLIGHTS


1. Buy your tickets online
Buying your tickets online will actually help you save more money than buying at the airport or at an agent. Services like Google Flights or others which can be found by a simple online search.

2. Join Frequent flyers
Frequent flyer programs have a lot of benefits and some can offer discounts on future tickets after building up miles, and others may even offer free flights!

3. Not All Sales are Lowest prices
Sometimes a flight ticket may be on sale, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it is a bargain for you. Always keep this in mind because that sale could end up costing you more than other deals!

4. Check For Hidden Fees
Always check other fees for tickets that may not be listed at first sight of the price. Make sure to be aware of the price of the ticket at all times and this can be avoided. Many hidden fees are luggage or even meals.

5. Compare Ticket Prices
If you are shopping online, there are various sites you can use to compare prices for different venders of tickets.

6. Choose The Right airline
Make sure when traveling on a budget to go with the airline that is the most comfortable to your budget. Even though it may not be as popular as others, they all get you to your destination!

7. Select an  Off-Hours flight
When shopping for tickets, try to buy tickets that have flights early in the morning or late at night if you can. Sometimes these tickets can save you a bundle!

8. Buy tickets months In Advance
Try to plan your trips, if possible, months in advance to save a lot more in the long run. Sometimes, depending on where you travel, this little tip can end up saving you hundreds on your tickets.

9. Find Vacation Packages
When planning your vacations, try to purchase trip packages as they can end up saving you a ton of money in the long run. If you have the time, compare a package with the costs of buying everything separate.

10. Different Types Of Flights Help You Save
Sometimes it would be wiser if possible to purchase a flight that maybe has one stop before it reaches its final destination, instead of doing a non-stop flight. This can end up helping you save and you can even enjoy the different merchandise at the airport you stop at before your flight continues.





              WHISTLER SKI RESORT 
     AMERICA'S BEST SKI DESTINATIONS


Located in the town of Whistler in British Columbia, Canada - Whistler's Ski resort  has almost 10,000 acres of ski terrain and is one of North America's most popular ski destinations....read more


  REFINANCING YOUR MORTGAGE
         CAN SAVE YOU MONEY


Interested in refinancing home mortgage loans but not sure it makes financial sense? Learn how to crunch the numbers and make an informed financial decision rather than playing an expensive guessing game with these simple steps.

A lower interest rate can save you money each month on your mortgage and can save you thousands over the life of the loan. Is it possible to lower your debt and reduce monthly payments by taking out a new loan? Surprisingly the answer is often "yes". Learn how to get a lower interest rate by refinancing without breaking the bank.

How Refinancing Works
Refinancing basically involves taking out a new loan which is used to pay off the prior mortgage. To put it another way, the new mortgage replaces the old one. This is especially helpful when interest rates have dropped since it allows homeowners to pay off older mortgages with a high interest rate in exchange for a new mortgage with a lower interest rate.

Getting a Lower Interest
To demonstrate how effective it is to lower your interest rate by refinancing, consider an example of a buyer who purchased a home for $210,000 in 2001. The original mortgage was $200,000 for a 30 year term with a fixed interest rate of 7 percent and monthly mortgage payment of $1330. Since the original down payment was only 5 percent or $10,000 plus closing costs, they also had to pay PMI or Private Mortgage Insurance of $125 per month.

Now that mortgage rates have dropped to 5 percent or even less, the homeowner is contemplating a refinance. The current balance on the home is $180,000 and the value of the home is appraised at $260,000. Since the home has 20 percent equity and the homeowner does not intend to take cash out at closing, they will automatically save $125 per month in PMI. By refinancing at a lower interest rate of 5 percent fixed for 30 years the new mortgage payment will be approximately $965 per month ...a savings of nearly $400 plus the PMI of $125 for a total monthly savings of over $500 per month. 

               
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          WHAT TO KNOW
  BEFORE YOU BUY A HOUSE



Most buyers conduct a lot of research online before ever stepping foot in a home. Buyers spend an average of 6 to 8 weeks, according to the National Association of REALTORS, trying to figure out where they want to live. But once the neighborhood is selected, most buyers end up buying a home after 2 or 3 home tours.

Figure out what you can afford before you look. Get pre-approved for a home loan before your home search so that you don’t waste time on those that you can’t afford. Scour your credit history and resolve any black marks before applying for a home loan.

Homes typically should cost about two and a half times your salary as a rule of thumb, although you also must consider your monthly expenses and what you want to save. Because you will be responsible for unforeseen repairs and property taxes, a healthy amount of savings can come in handy.

Beware of mortgage brokers who are a little too fast and loose with approving you. If you qualify, you may be able to make a down payment as low as 3 percent interest. Paying down “points” is good for those living in a home for three to five years, as it takes a dent out of the interest rate as you pay a portion of the interest at closing.


              
READ MORE





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HOW TO CONTEST A FORECLOSURE



How you contest a foreclosure depends  on where you live because each state has it's own laws and rules regarding real-estate. If your state requires the foreclosing party to sue you (judicial foreclosure), then it may be a little easier (and less expensive) to jump into the existing lawsuit. If your state allows foreclosures to proceed without court supervision (nonjudicial foreclosure), then you’ll have to bring your own lawsuit-a challenging and expensive process.

The right of redemption is an equitable right, foreclosure is an action in equity. To keep the right of redemption, the debtor may be able to petition the court for an injunction. If repossession is imminent the debtor must seek a temporary restraining order. However, the debtor may have to post a bond in the amount of the debt. This protects the creditor if the attempt to stop foreclosure is simply an attempt to escape the debt.

A debtor may also challenge the validity of the debt in a claim against the bank to stop the foreclosure and sue for damages. In a foreclosure proceeding, the lender also bears the burden of proving they have standing to foreclose.

If you are motivated to contest the foreclosure because you want to keep your home indefinitely, then hiring an attorney to explain not only the stated laws but also the specific documents that are necessary for your jurisdiction is the best course of action.

Foreclosures are broken into two categories, judicial and non-judicial. While the end result  is usually the same, an auction of the home, the judicial foreclosure involves the court, but the non-judicial does not. In addition, a judicial foreclosure will take longer to complete, as it must be processed through the court system for the jurisdiction where the house is located. As the process unfolds, it is the responsibility of the bank or lender to petition the court to rectify the status of non-payment. This court action is known as lis pendens, which translates literally to "litigation is pending."

In judicial foreclosure states, the foreclosing party must bring a lawsuit to get the foreclosure started. In the process you will be notified of the foreclosure lawsuit when papers called a summons and complaint are delivered to (served on) you. They will advise you of the law­suit and give you a period of time within which you must respond if you choose to contest it. Also, the foreclosing party will have the burden of proving to the judge that the foreclosure is justified under the terms of the mortgage.

You can respond or not; it's your choice. Either way you do respond, the mortgage holder will be required to prove that the foreclosure is legal (although if you don’t respond, the chances are excellent that the foreclosure will go through). The proof will typically consist of a thick bundle of documents containing various papers that you signed when obtaining or refinancing your mortgage. There will also be notices, signed agreements, internal accountings of payments both made and missed, and written statements under oath (called declarations or, if sworn before a notary public, affidavits) from lender and mortgage servicer officials who have knowledge of:
-your missed payments
-the lender’s compliance with your state’s laws regarding foreclosure procedures, and
-the circumstances through which your lender came to own the mortgage.

Surprisingly, as a general rule, if you don’t point out errors or omissions in the paperwork, the court will accept the papers as evidence that will support a foreclosure judgment and order for sale.

If you choose to respond, you will have the chance to inform a judge just why you think the papers are wrong and that foreclosure should not be approved. To contest the foreclosure, you can file a simple form, called an answer in most places. In it, you state your factual and legal arguments for opposing the foreclosure. In this form you must include all the reasons and facts that pertain to you mortgage.

If you have evidence of your own regarding these issues, you also can file your own sworn statements. For example, if the lender claims that you missed five payments, but you can prove (typically with canceled checks) that you missed only one, you would submit a statement under oath to that effect and attach your canceled checks.

The court clerk will set a date for a hearing, at which the judge will hear arguments on the paperwork submitted by both sides. After the hearing, the judge may:
-make a decision based solely on the paperwork
-postpone the hearing for a month or two to give the ­parties more time to gather more information. For example, if the paperwork filed by the foreclosing party doesn’t show authorization to bring the foreclosure lawsuit, the judge may continue the hearing for a month so that the foreclosing party can bring in additional documentation, or

-decide that the information in the paperwork is inadequate and schedule an “evidentiary” hearing a month or two later at which the parties will present their cases through live witnesses who can be questioned by the judge and cross-examined by the other side. For example, if there is conflict over missed payments, both you and an official from the mortgage servicer would testify, and the judge would decide which of you is most likely telling the truth.

After any later hearings, the judge will either order the foreclosure to go ahead (and in many states, set the sale date), or dismiss the case, sending the lender back to the drawing board. Thi will conclude the foreclosure process for your case.

Redemption periods have been written into the state codes for a great number of jurisdictions that provide judicial foreclosures. Such a period can be anywhere from six months to a year in length and provides you with additional time to gather the necessary funds to ensure continued ownership of your home. In fact, even after negotiations with the bank have failed or,  further still, the house has been sold at auction, the redemption period provides one final opportunity to get the house back. Even in the eleventh hour of the redemption period, if you are able to secure the funds, you will legally be eligible to regain ownership of the home--and at auction price. more on foreclosures




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